Eyelid/facial lumps bumps and lesions

Eyelid/facial lump/bumps/lesions are common in patients referred to oculoplastic surgeons. Many lesions can be readily diagnosed on the basis of their clinical examination characteristics alone e.g. a chalazion (or meibomian cyst).

A number of other lesions can also be readily diagnosed by clinical examination alone. The main goal in the evaluation of these lesions is to differentiate malignant from benign lesions. In general, the majority of malignant tumours affecting the eyelids and periocular area are slowly enlarging, destructive lesions that distort or frankly destroy eyelid anatomy. There are a number of subtle features that can help to differentiate malignant from benign eyelid tumours. Some malignant lesions, however, may appear innocuous. Conversely some benign lesions may appear sinister. For this reason it can be extremely difficult to make the correct diagnosis of an eyelid lesion without a biopsy.

For small lesions an excisional biopsy (the whole lesion is removed) serves two functions: diagnosis and treatment. For larger lesions an incisional biopsy (only a small piece of the lesion is removed) is undertaken for diagnostic purposes. The lesion is then treated appropriately on the basis of the histopathology report (for which there is a separate charge).

Private minor surgery

We are able to offer private minor surgery, including consultation, with prices starting from £275.

Recent changes in local NHS commissioning means that many CCG’s (Clinical Commissioning Groups) no longer fund minor surgery procedures for patients with benign lumps and bumps, where the surgery is not considered clinically essential e.g. for conditions such as a skin tag, eyelid cyst or chalazion, benign mole, sebaceous cyst, warts, xanthelasma etc. (Likewise, for patients who have private health insurance, some insurance companies will not fund this surgery).

We can offer a high quality, low cost minor operations service to patients on a private (i.e. self-paying) basis. This includes general body skin lumps and bumps. Patients may either self refer, or be referred via their GP or optician.

We can provide you with a quote for a fully inclusive price depending on the nature of the surgery required. We will need you to complete our healthcare questionnaire in advance and to provide details of the lump/bump(s) of concern to enable us to give you an accurate quote.  We need to know whether or not you are taking any blood thinners e.g. Warfarin, or any other medications which predispose to excessive bleeding and bruising.

Can the surgical procedure be done on the same day?

Although a minor surgery operation performed under a local anaesthetic is by definition “minor”, it is still a surgical procedure. It is important that you have a period of reflection to consider whether or not you wish to proceed with the surgery after seeing your surgeon. You can then book the operation at another time to suit yourself.

If you have been referred by your GP, however, you may already have had the opportunity to discuss the pros and cons of minor surgery. In this case, we would be happy to undertake your minor surgery on the same day if that suits you better. Please take into account the possibility that you may not be able to drive home following such surgery if this has involved your eyelid(s).

How to book

If you would like further details about this service then please contact our clinic Face & Eye on: 0161 947 2720 or email us about your query.




Eyelid/facial lumps bumps and lesions

The surgery is usually performed under local anaesthesia (a tiny needle is inserted in the skin around the lesion and local anaesthetic solution is injected). For patients who are anxious a light sedative can be given intravenously by an anaesthetist in the operating theatre ("twilight anaesthesia"). This acts very quickly but also wears off very quickly after the surgery. For children or patients who are very anxious about surgery around their eyes a very short general anaesthetic can be arranged in hospital, again on a day case basis.

How long will I stay in the clinic?

Minor surgical procedures are performed as day cases. You should be able to undergo the procedure and be discharged within an hour. You must not drive on the same day as you may have a patch over your eye or ointment in your eye which will blur your vision.

Eyelid/facial lumps bumps and lesions

You will visit the clinic a few days or weeks before the date of your surgery to have a preoperative consultation. (If arranged in advance, and if the lump/bump/lesion is small, it may be possible to remove this is the clinic on the same day as your consultation). In addition to examining the lesion(s) you will be asked questions about your current and past health, and about any allergies you may have, medications you are taking (including over the counter products e.g. Aspirin, Indomethacin, Voltarol, Ibuprofen, Diclofenac, and whether or not you smoke.

Please answer all questions completely and honestly as they are asked only for your own wellbeing, so that your surgery can be planned as carefully as possible. If you are unsure of the names of any medications, bring them with you. You will be told whether or not to stop any medications at this preoperative clinic visit. For example, if you are taking aspirin-containing medicines or anticoagulants, they may need to be temporarily withdrawn or reduced in dose for two weeks before the procedure. This will need to be discussed with your GP to ensure that it is safe to withdraw these medications for your surgery.

Your vision in each eye is measured. Your eyes are also examined carefully. Photographs of the lesion may be taken for documentation. Some insurance companies insist on this.

PLEASE NOTE: There is no such thing as a minor operation when this involves the removal of a lesion close to the eye. For most patients it is preferable to arrange the surgery on a separate occasion and not immediately following the consultation.

Eyelid/facial lumps bumps and lesions

After surgery, the eye may be covered with a dressing which you should leave in place until the following morning. This will help to keep bruising and swelling to a minimum. Take a simple analgesic if required e.g. paracetamol. You should wash your hands thoroughly before removing the dressing and before touching the wound. You should clean the wound 3 times a day using cotton wool soaked in saline or cool boiled water. Dry the area with the cotton wool and then apply antibiotic ointment 3 times a day for 2 weeks. Sterile cotton wool can be purchased from the clinic. http://www.faceandeyeshop.co.uk/product_detail.cfm?id=26

If you have undergone a biopsy the histopathology report will be sent to you and to your GP as soon as it has been received from the pathologist. If the lesion is benign and there are no problems you may not need to return to the clinic for a check but in the event of any problems you should call the clinic and arrange a further appointment.

What our patients say

I am absolutely delighted with my results and can't thank Mr Ataullah enough for making my whole experience so relaxed and successful! Read PS's email